Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Women's History Month

http://miami.happeningmag.com/wp-content/uploads/womens-history-month.jpg
 
The1987 Congress declared March as National Women’s History Month.

This year in recognition of National Women’s History Month, the library display will showcase powerful women who’ve courageously changed history. “Their work to break down barriers has allowed future generations of women to pass through without resistance.” (From Days of the Year website.)

Visit the library throughout the month of March and check out our display on women who’ve changed history.  (Click on this link to learn more~~Book, Media, Website, Events!)

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Black History Month


Cuyamaca College Library
Celebrates
Black History Month


The Library display will honor African Americans and their tremendous contributions to American history. We will showcase Black History through time with posters displayed on both floors in the library as well as books featuring famous African Americans and landmark historical topics. Visit the library to learn more!

https://tse3.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.5aa21c2a73c0bc73aef968f47dacb8ed&pid=15.1&P=0&w=304&h=172
Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month.

The story of Black History Month begins in 1915, half a century after the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the United States. The event inspired schools and communities nationwide to organize local celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures.

https://tse2.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.IZW_ePq1i7ezr4ioHA2W_wEsDv&pid=15.1&P=0&w=218&h=175In the decades that followed, mayors of cities across the country began issuing yearly proclamations recognizing “Negro History Week”. By the late 1960s, thanks in part to the Civil Rights Movement and a growing awareness of black identity, Negro History Week had evolved into Black History Month on many college campuses. President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976, calling upon the public to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”